A tour at the pace of my 1.5 year old

Six months ago, I moved to Walla Walla with my partner and one year old son. Walla Walla is a vibrant small town in rural Eastern Washington, nestled among expansive agricultural fields and the Blue Mountains. The pace of life here is unhurried. And the pace of life with an 18 month old is dawdling.  

What if I were to give a tour of my town, my new neighborhood as I experience it? 

a response to my sketch, "between"

In early May, I shared a sketch titled, between.  In response to that drawing, I composed the following piece using Anne Carson's 'short talk' poetry form.   This work was installed on a plaque at Smoke Farm for the Lo-Fi Arts Festival // Ad Hoc.  It was situated at the intersection of two diverging paths.
 

Short Talk on Pairs

Socks are worn in pairs, usually matched.
Brackets are always used in matched pairs.  
When writing, brackets can be used to inject or
set apart text. They can denote an idea related to
but separate from the original idea discussed.
Empty brackets indicate omitted text.
Before I leave the house I put on my shoes.

Press your hands together in front of your chest.  
Pause. Separate them slightly. Pause. Repeat.

what is (porous)


scissors (finger holes), drain (water holes), bobbin (gap around the barrel, center of the hub), needle (eye), door latch (inner hole of hub for door handle axis), wheel (center hole of the hub), button (eyes/corresponding button hole), dust pan (flat or curved scoop), pipe cleaner (gaps between bristles), sponge (pores), spirit level (bubble), trowel (flat or curved scoop), spade (slightly angled scoop), rotary blade (hub), bicycle chain (cutouts between links), cone wrench (u shaped cutout), crank spanner (hex bolt shaped cutout), tire lever (c shaped cutout), spoke wrench (spoke nipple indentation), bike pump (hand operated piston), pipette (inner cylinder), vise-grip (space between the jaws, hub, inner space around spring, space within grips), pliers (space between jays, hub, inner space within grips), baster (inner cylinder), bottle opener (space around the lever), bowl (inner), spoon (dish), sieve (small holes for particles), fork (gaps between tines), cake server (area above the flat face), garlic press (inner scoop and holes on the face), potato peeler (oval or rectangular shaped slot in the face), colander (inner bowl and holes), funnel (inner pipe and conical dish), corkscrew (space around the twisted screw), chinoise (conical inner area and small holes), cheesecloth (gaps in weave), cherry pitter (gap for lever and inner void the size of a spherical nickel), egg poacher (inner dish and holes), egg separator (slots between the spiral cone shaped head), egg slicer (slotted dish and area around individual wires/blades), fish scaler (slots and grooves), flour sifter (gaps in wire mesh and handle lever), slotted spoon (slots), grater (holes and divots), ladle (dish), lemon reamer (grooves), juicer (donuts shaped dish and grooves), mandolin (rectangular slots), pick ( gaps between tines), measuring cup (dish), measuring spoon (smaller dishes) , meat tenderizer (grooves), mortar (dish and miniscule granular divots in base), nutcracker (grooves in head and gap for nut), oven mitt (inner space generally shape of a hand), pastry bag (conical tip), pastry blender (area around each individual blade, ricer (inner scoop and holes on the face), poultry shears (area between blades), roller docker (space around prickly heads), rolling pin (inner hub), salt shaker (holes in face), spider (holes in mesh basket), whisk (area around wire loops), wooden spoon (shallow inner dish), zester (spaces around perforated head)

initially posted February 18, 2014
updated March 22 + March 24, 2014
audio recorded May, 2014
still in construction

threshold

what is a threshold?

a fence
a diving board
a door sill.

a tideline
a url
an entry (gate).

a place or point of entering. a beginning.
the point at which a stimulus is of sufficient intensity to begin to produce an effect.

a door sill
a portal

a limen.
liminal.

-tia kramer

what is (not there)

scissors (finger holes), drain (water holes), bobbin (gap around the barrel, center of the hub), needle (eye), door latch (inner hole of hub for door handle axis), wheel (center hole of the hub), button (eyes/corresponding button hole), dust pan (flat or curved scoop), pipe cleaner (gaps between bristles), sponge (pores), spirit level (bubble), trowel (flat or curved scoop), spade (slightly angled scoop), rotary blade (hub), bicycle chain (cutouts between links), cone wrench (u shaped cutout), crank spanner (hex bolt shaped cutout), tire lever (c shaped cutout), spoke wrench (spoke nipple indentation), bike pump (hand operated piston), pipette (inner cylinder), vise-grip (space between the jaws, hub, inner space around spring, space within grips), pliers (space between jays, hub, inner space within grips), baster (inner cylinder), bottle opener (space around the lever), bowl (inner), spoon (dish), sieve (small holes for particles), fork (gaps between tines), cake server (area above the flat face), garlic press (inner scoop and holes on the face), potato peeler (oval or rectangular shaped slot in the face), colander (inner bowl and holes), funnel (inner pipe and conical dish), corkscrew (space around the twisted screw), chinoise (conical inner area and small holes), cheesecloth (gaps in weave), cherry pitter (gap for lever and inner void the size of a spherical nickel), egg poacher (inner dish and holes), egg separator (slots between the spiral cone shaped head), egg slicer (slotted dish and area around individual wires/blades), fish scaler (slots and grooves), flour sifter (gaps in wire mesh and handle lever), slotted spoon (slots), grater (holes and divots), ladle (dish), lemon reamer (grooves), juicer (donuts shaped dish and grooves), mandolin (rectangular slots), pick ( gaps between tines), measuring cup (dish), measuring spoon (smaller dishes) , meat tenderizer (grooves), mortar (dish and miniscule granular divots in base), nutcracker (grooves in head and gap for nut), oven mitt (inner space generally shape of a hand), pastry bag (conical tip), pastry blender (area around each individual blade, ricer (inner scoop and holes on the face), poultry shears (area between blades), roller docker (space around prickly heads), rolling pin (inner hub), salt shaker (holes in face), spider (holes in mesh basket), whisk (area around wire loops), wooden spoon (shallow inner dish), zester (spaces around perforated head)

initially posted February 18, 2014
updated March 22 + March 24, 2014
still in construction

re-visiting TAB

Control "t"
06. 2006


Q: Why do you think she just moved her left arm into a slump? 

A:  Art allows me to reconfigure and re-contextualize information,
to draw awareness to the inherent meaning we accumulate in everyday life.

Q:  What circumstances allow openness?
A:  If you press down on the ‘control’ key and the letter ‘t’, the transition function
will appear.

Q:  How should one respond to ambiguity?
A:   I am rather engaged with experience, time.  Watching time pass and un-pass, watching my history unfold and fold upon itself.  I am  interested in impermanence and making tangible my relational  experiences.

Q:  How do I relate to my shoes?
A:  I draw upon  my experiences studying music in Ghana, West Africa, and with the  Macalester College African Music Ensemble in Minnesota.  Sowah Mensah,  my primary mentor, repeatedly instructed our ensemble, “Do not think.   Do not try to understand this music.  Simply follow my movements  [exactly].”

Q:  What does it mean to bridge a gap in understanding?
A:  There are two ways to cross the river.  One is to take the bridge, the other is to row or swim.  I prefer rowing.

Q:  Is there a word that means, “to embody with the intention of growing intimately familiar?”
A:   Through the processes of mimicry and repetition, I accumulated musical  knowledge through the conscientious practice of intimation rather than  note reading or intellectual comprehension. I am captivated by how this  approach challenges Western epistemology.  Such an approach favors  intimate knowledge gained through experience over publicly verifiable  knowledge understood through the mind.

Q:  How do we integrate seemingly unrelated, or conflicting information into our lives?
A:   The variegated thrush, a bird found in the rainy regions of the  Western United States, makes a call that simultaneously sounds like both   a whistle and a hum in dissonant harmonics.

Q:  How do I create meaning in my life?
A:  It’s under that down pillow.

Q:  Who ate the last of the black berries?
A:   Habituating re-enlivens objects that are disempowered or silenced by  their loss of function as well as by our own lack of awareness. The silencing of these objects correlates to the systematic silencing of  communities of people, such as many Ghanaian women who have found  themselves financially paralyzed since the onset of colonialism.  Some  women from the Adaklu Region have begun using their traditional textile skills, particularly spinning, to tap the tourism industry to gain  financial independence.  The re-enliving of these silenced containers  references this emancipatory act.